Class of 1930s - 1950s

Robert Geddes MArch ’50 Awarded Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts Degree from Princeton University

Robert Geddes MArch ’50

Robert Geddes MArch ’50, Princeton University’s William Kenan, Jr., Professor of Architecture, Emeritus, was awarded an honorary degree for his contributions to the field of architecture by Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber during the University’s Commencement exercises on Tuesday, June 5th.

Geddes joined Princeton’s faculty in 1965 as dean of the School of Architecture, serving as dean for 17 years before retiring in 1989. Under his leadership, the school emerged as a major center for the exchange of architectural ideas, while retaining its small size and close ties with the rest of the University. Geddes connected architecture with the humanities and social sciences, and with public affairs and urban design. He co-founded a collaborative practice, Geddes Brecher Qualls & Cunningham: Architects (GBQC), in Philadelphia and Princeton, which won several national and international design competitions. Geddes is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the National Academy of Design. In 1979, GBQC was awarded the highest professional honor of AIA, the Architectural Firm Award, for “design quality, respect for the environment and social concern.”

Geddes joined Princeton’s faculty in 1965 as dean of the School of Architecture, a role he served in for 17 years before retiring in 1989. Under his leadership, the school emerged as a major center for the exchange of architectural ideas, while retaining its small size and close ties with the rest of the University. Geddes connected architecture with the humanities and social sciences, and with public affairs and urban design. He co-founded a collaborative practice, Geddes Brecher Qualls & Cunningham: Architects, in Philadelphia and Princeton, which won several national and international design competitions, including for the Vienna South-Urban Extension in Austria, the Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center in Alabama, and the home for seniors, Architects Housing Company, in Trenton, New Jersey. The firm also designed several buildings at universities in the United States, and in the Princeton area designed the dining hall quad at the Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton Community Housing’s Griggs Farm neighborhood. Geddes is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the National Academy of Design. In 1979, GBQC was awarded the highest professional honor of AIA, the Architectural Firm Award, for “design quality, respect for the environment and social concern.” Geddes was the urban design consultant for the Center City Plan of Philadelphia (1988) and the Third Regional Plan of New York for the Regional Plan Association (1996). He received the AIA/ACSA Award for Excellence in Architectural Education in 1984.

Geddes’ official citation (below) was read at the Commencement ceremony:

A gifted architect and teacher, he practiced and taught architecture as a social art engaged in the design of the human environment. As the first dean of Princeton’s School of Architecture, he heightened its eminence and distinctiveness, expanded its scope, broadened its curriculum, and deepened its connections with the humanities, social sciences and public affairs. His “Princeton Report” for the American Institute of Architects changed the structure of architectural education in the United States by galvanizing these kinds of cross-disciplinary connections. His buildings express his deep understanding of the human experience and a prodigious environmental sensitivity; they serve as artful lessons in shaping the built environment.

Learn more.

Images provided.

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posted September, 2018

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Constantine E. (Dinos) Michaelides MArch ’57 Authors Third Book on Vernacular Architecture of the Aegean Islands

Constantine E. (Dinos) Michaelides MArch ’57

Kastra: Architecture and Culture in the Aegean Archipelago, the third and final book on the vernacular architecture of the Aegean islands by Constantine E. (Dinos) Michaelides MArch ’57has been published by the The Washington University Libraries through Digital Library Publishing Services (DLPS) on the Open Scholarship repository. A sequel to The Aegean CrucibleKastra explores the collective fortifications of the Aegean archipelago and includes stunning photography of the region. Michaelides joined the faculty of Washington University as an assistant professor of architecture and instructor of architectural design studios in 1960, and later served as dean of the School of Architecture. 

Learn more.

posted August, 2018

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In Memorium: Richard Lewis Haag MLA ’52

Richard Lewis Haag MLA '52

Richard Lewis Haag MLA ’52 passed away on May 9, 2018. He was 94. Haag was an award winning landscape architect who designed the internationally respected Gas Works Park in Seattle and founded the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington.  Haag was also known for designing Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island, redesigning Seattle Center after the World’s Fair to make it a public park, and designing Steinbrueck Park in Seattle with Victor Steinbrueck. His work is noteworthy for its inventive approach, sensitivity to the environment and adaptive re-use of structures and facilities. He was also a respected and passionate teacher who encouraged students to fight for great landscape architecture, his fellow professionals said. Haag enlisted in the Army during World War II. He attended the University of Illinois, and received a bachelor’s of landscape architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, and a master’s of landscape architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He won a Fulbright to study in Japan for two years, and was a resident at the American Academy in Rome. Haag challenged his students to look at projects in an environmental, social, ethical and political way. He taught them that dealing with the built environment meant that they must engage with all those interlocking issues, she said, and it was a heavy responsibility.

Haag is survived by his wife, Cheryl Trivison, founder of Friends of Gas Works Park, his children and grandchildren.

For more about his accomplishments click here

 

posted August, 2018

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Book by Richard Shieldhouse MCRP ’82 Offers In Depth Look at Life and Work of William Morgan AB ’52, MArch ’58

Richard Shieldhouse MCRP '82, William Morgan AB '52, MArch '58

A new book by planner, preservationist, and tourism expert Richard Shieldhouse MCRP ’82  offers a personal look at the life and work of William Morgan AB ’52, MArch ’58 (1930–2016). A visionary architect, early supporter of green design principles, and recipient of the GSD’s Wheelwright Prize, Morgan is known for his signature style which brought together modernism, earth architecture, and aspects of ancient North American building. William Morgan: Evolution of an Architect is the first publication to explore Morgan’s personal life as a way of understanding the roots of his creativity. It is scheduled to be released later this month (August 2018) by the University Press of Florida. 

“Elegantly written and based upon Shieldhouse’s extensive interviews with the architect, William Morgan is indispensable, opening new avenues of understanding why and how Morgan’s research about earth and pre-Columbian architecture enabled an extraordinary oeuvre of humanist architecture in the globalizing world, achieving the embodiment of his democratic and pioneering multicultural, environmental, and ethical agenda,” says Jean-François Lejeune, coeditor of Modern Architecture and the Mediterranean: Vernacular Dialogues and Contested Identities.

Learn more.

 

posted August, 2018

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In Memoriam: David Lewis Paulson MArch ’57

David Lewis Paulson '57

David Lewis Paulson ’57 died at home on October 10, 2017, at the age of 86. After graduating from the GSD, Paulson joined the faculty of the Department of Architecture at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he was part of the founding of the School of Architecture and subsequently the College of Environmental Design (later named the College of Architecture and Planning). In 1991, he was granted the title Professor Emeritus upon his retirement. He also taught at the University of Connecticut at Storrs (1966-1967), the Institute for Shipboard Education on Semester at Sea (1977), and the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, where he held a fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and a research grant from the Japan-United States Friendship Commission.

Read Paulson’s full obituary.

Image courtesy of Legacy.com.

posted February, 2018

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Alumni Honored at 7th Annual BSA Design Awards Gala

Henry Cobb AB '47, MArch '49, Matthew Kiefer LF '96, Roger P. Ferris MDes '93, LF92, Sheila Kennedy MArch ’85, J. Frano Violich MArch ’84, Grace La AB '92, MArch '95, James Dallman MArch '92, Nader Tehrani MAUD ’91

The Boston Society of Architects celebrated its 2017 Design Award recipients at a gala on January 18, 2018. A number of Harvard University Graduate School of alumni and their firms were recognized, including Henry Cobb AB 47, MArch 49 who received the 2017 BSA Award of Honor.

Other alumni honored include Matthew Kiefer LF ’96 (BSA Honorary Membership); Roger Ferris + Partners, firm of Roger P. Ferris LF 92, MDes 93 (Category: Housing Design, Project: Green House, Client: Private (award)); Kennedy and Violich Architecture, firm of Sheila Kennedy MArch ’85 and J. Frano Violich MArch ’84 (Category: Small Firms/Small Projects Design Awards, Project: Meister Consultants Group—A Cadmus Company Offices, Clients: Meister Consultants Group (award)); La Dallman Architects, firm of Grace La AB 92, MArch 95 and James Dallman MArch 92 (Category: Unbuilt Architecture and Design, Projects: Industrial Capriccio: Floating Garden (honor award) and Waterlily Landing (citation)); and NADAAA, firm of Nader Tehrani MAUD ’91 (Category: Unbuilt Architecture and Design, Project: Justice in Design (award); Category: Honor Awards for Design Excellence, Project: Tanderrum Pedestrian Bridge with John Wardle Architects, Client: Major Projects Victoria (honor award)).

See the full list of 2017 Design Award winners.

Read more about the Gala.

Image courtesy of the Boston Real Estate Times.

posted January, 2018

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[RSVP Details Updated 11/14] NYC Street Co-Naming Ceremony for J. Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58 to be Held November 19, 2017

J. Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58

A street co-naming ceremony in honor of J. Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58 will take place on Sunday, November 19th at 1:00 pm in New York City. A pioneering African-American architect and educator from New York, Bond passed away in 2009 at the age of 73. Among his many notable projects are the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, which includes Dr. King’s tomb; the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama; and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. Bond was the partner in charge of the museum portion of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center at the time of his death.

In 2012, Community Board 12 Manhattan unanimously passed a resolution to recognize co-naming the southeast corner of St. Nicholas Avenue & West 162 street J. Max Bond, Jr. Way in his honor.

Event details [updated 11/14/17]:

To honor the legacy of J. Max Bond, Jr., FAIA, inspirational and visionary architect, educator, activist for social justice and role model to generations of architects, the southeast corner of West 162nd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue will be co-named J. Max Bond, Jr. Way.

Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 1:00 PM

In partnership with U.S. Congressman Adriano Espaillat, NYS Senator Marisol Alcantara, NYS Assemblywoman Carmen De La Rosa, Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer, Manhattan Community Board 12, The Morris – Jumel Mansion, Family and Friends of J. Max Bond, Jr., community institutions and leaders.

RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
Alianza Dominicana Cultural Center
530 West 166th Street. 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10032

RSVP to cmrodriguezevents@gmail.com by November 17, 2017

Photo courtesy of The New York Times.

posted November, 2017

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In Memoriam: John David Anderson AB ’49, MArch ’52

John David Anderson AB '49, MArch '52

John D. “Andy” Anderson AB ’49, MArch ’52 passed away on Sunday, May 21, at the age of 90. After graduating from the GSD in 1952 he headed West, founding Anderson Architects in Denver, CO, which eventually became Anderson Mason Dale. Anderson was a strong proponent of energy conservation and sustainable design, and appeared as a lecturer and panelist on sustainable building design throughout the United States and abroad. He also served as an important mentor to many in the GSD community. His full obituary was published in the Denver Post.

Anderson’s life will be celebrated on Wednesday, May 31, at a service in Denver.

Photo courtesy of Legacy.com 

posted May, 2017

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Cornelia Hahn Oberlander BLA ’47 Receives 2017 Landscape Architecture Foundation Medal

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander BLA '47

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander BLA ’47, OC, MBCSCLA, FCSCLA, FASLA is the 2017 recipient of the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) Medal. This award honors a landscape architect for “distinguished work over a career in applying the principles of sustainability to landscapes,” according to the Foundation’s website. One of the first female graduates of the GSD, Oberlander collaborated with James Rose GSD ’36, ’38 and Dan Kiley GSD ’36, ’38 early in her career. She founded her own practice in 1953 after moving to Canada with her husband, urban planner H. Peter Oberlander MCP ’47, PHD ’57.

With a career spanning 70 years, Oberlander has received numerous honors for her work and contributions to the field of landscape architecture. A few include the ASLA Medal from the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Margolese National Design for Living Prize from the University of British Columbia, and the Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award from the International Federation of Landscape Architects.

Read more about Oberlander, her work, and the LAF Medal.

Image courtesy of LAF.

 

posted May, 2017

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Peter Walker MLA ’57 Receives Inaugural Richard Brettell Award in the Arts

Peter Walker MLA '57

Peter Walker MLA ’57, FASLA – Senior Founding Partner of PWP Landscape Architecture – is the inaugural recipient of the 2017 Richard Brettell Award in the Arts at The University of Texas at Dallas. Honoring an artist “whose body of work demonstrates a lifetime of achievement in their field,” the bi-annual award includes a week’s residency at UT Dallas, as well as a monetary prize. With a career spanning over five-decades in the field, Walker is known for his transformative designs including the National September 11 Memorial. He also designed the ongoing campus enhancement plan at UT Dallas.

“I am extremely honored to receive the Brettell Award in the Arts,” said Walker. “I am grateful to the University, Professor Brettell and our great patron, Margaret McDermott. Working on the campus over the years has been one of the most gratifying experiences of my career.”

Read more here.

Photo courtsey of PWP Landscape Architecture.

posted April, 2017

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Maurice Finegold MArch ’58 Honored with Distinguished Alumnus Award

Maurice Finegold MArch '58

Maurice Finegold MArch ’58 has been honored with a Distinguished Alumnus Award from his alma mater, Classical High School. Read more.

Photo courtesy of Classical High School Alumni Association. 

posted March, 2017

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In Memoriam: William Breger MArch ’45

William Breger MArch '45

William Breger MArch ’45 passed away on February 23, 2015 at age 92. Read his obituary here.

posted December, 2016

In Memoriam

In Memoriam: William W. Landsberg MArch ’38

William W. Landsberg MArch ’38

In Memoriam 
William W. LandsbergMArch ’38

William W. Landsberg (February 9, 1915 – October 6, 2013) was an Brooklyn-born modernist architect who designed dozens of homes, synagogues, and commercial buildings in the New York metropolitan area in the 50s and 60s. Landsberg studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Design under Marcel Breuer and Walter Gropius. He worked for both after graduation. Read more.

posted December, 2016

In Memoriam

In Memoriam: J. Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58

Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58

Pioneering African-American architect and educator from New York, J. Max Bond Jr. AB ‘55, MArch ‘58, passed away on February 18th, 2009, at the age of 73. Founder of the firm Bond Ryder & Associates, Bond’s notable projects include the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, which includes Dr. King’s tomb; the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama; and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. Bond was the partner in charge of the museum portion of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center at the time of his death. He also served as an educator at City College and Columbia University. Read his full obituary in The New York Times

Photo courtesy of The New York Times.

posted February, 2009

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